Independent Signatories of
The Manifesto for Agile Software Development

We are uncovering better ways of developing software by doing it and helping others do it. Through this work we have come to value:
  • Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
  • Working software over comprehensive documentation
  • Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
  • Responding to change over following a plan

That is, while there is value in the items on the right, we value the items on the left more.

 
Click here to add your name to the list of signatories.

Signatures Received: 18 Apr to 03 May 2006
Thirumalai Kumar: People are more important than process.Agile method will certainly result in a Quality Software
Juan Palacio: (Navegapolis) For efficient, humanist and common sense based management.
Russell Healy: (Cadence Technology)
Bruno Iecker: Dynamic code over boring paper.
Rodolfo Hernandez: (Freelance) Really important being a developer it is to have this moral code of behavior. The simple fact of knowing about it means start changing the patterns.
Sarit Kommineni: (Satyam Computer Services) It is a very good compilation. It should be on every teamlead's desk.
Daniel Gąsienica.
Kenas Kong: (WLCTS)
Naren: I have around 8+ years of experience in the web application development in this industry and i strongly feel that Agile methodology is the way to go.
vivek sharma: Your manifesto is a real world manifestation of the Business world. The beauty is it being devoid of the associated hoopla, which is so common in this space.
Frank Gilroy: (http://www.frankgilroy.com)
Sunil Padmanabhan: (First American Real Estate Solutions)
Philip: (http://philip9876.rediffblogs.com) Attended the "Lotusphere comes to you -2006" in Singapore and had the opportunity to hear about this initiative from Alan and Steephan. Its a refreshing change to hear this initiative rather than the same old marketing stuff that a company tries to drill into our minds. A different approach towards looking at problems and hopefully achieving results in a better way. Cheers. http://philip9876.rediffblogs.com
Mohammed Qattan: This is my second time here, my first time was someone who really liked the idea and now i am some1 who is changing the community i have done my 4th XP project in less than 2 years i moved from Senior developer to Technical team leader to a project manager, and in less than 6 months i will be the section manager. Why? thank you XP, XP has made me able to deliver successful projects. my customers are always happy and they are willing to give us more work and project now i am spreading the knowledge for the univeristies and what do you know i make sure to stand up for the Document Oriented processes it is not easy, and it is much fun when the people wish that the they had eggs and tomato and i feel so proud that i follow the XP and i make presentations about XP i call them "XP When success is a mission" you cah check it on www.mqattan.com Thank you all (XP inventors and Implementors) next time i will submit a support it will be when i am on my own company doind XP to the bones thank you very much
Ernst Kuschke: (http://dotnet.org.za/ernst)
Fabian Wolf: (http://www.fwwd.de) I've been practicing these rules under a different label called 'fair play for/with the customer' since about 1998. In Deutsch: Ich wende ähnliche Regeln seit ca. 1998 an - allerdings nenne ich es 'Fair Play dem Kunden gegenüber'. ;)
Luis B.Chicaiza: (Dexon Software)
Pedro Galvan: (Software Guru magazine)
Chris Hackett.
Gary Bergeron: (CCI) The hardest issue in implementing Agile that I have encountered is in the sales cycle. Most people (especially Project Managers) are not ready to hear: - The overall project will probably never be done - Sorry but your customers desire to have their requirements conveyed in a few sessions is really just a pipe dream - Agile is a fundamental shift in the we think. The process itself is not revolutionary, it's in the attitude. Kind of Zen like. To get the sale we often sell out the principles of Agile only to try to work them in once we have the contract. Not good.
Eduardo Mercovich: (GaiaSur inSpiro) After years of trying to force predictive (traditional engineering) methods with variable results, I discovered the agile, or adaptative, circa 1999. These agile methods are useful not only for software development but for almost any project in which the first order variables are not predictable. Since I usually work with people in projects that are new (because of it's ideas or because they were previously not done by their organization), I have found this view very useful and invaluable many times in the last years. I do support completely the agile methodology and it's primary values. Thanks a lot for your inspiring work... :-)
Kevin L. Flanagan: (Technology Continuum) The Technology Continuum - From Inception to Reality… Technology starts as an idea: a new way of doing things, a new product, a new application, a new market. It then progresses from your idea to your customer’s hands. We facilitate your journey along that continuum.
Robert Sturim.
Sandeep Tyagi: (Inventa Technologies Limited) Our company is a supporter of agile software development manifesto. We believe that people should always come before the processes.
Michael Mahlberg: (independent consultant) To me the agile manifesto is the essence of all the "common sense" practices that made projects successful in the past decades. It's one of the best ways to strengthen practical approaches in software engineering and establish a new understanding of the field.
Rajalakshmi Balasubramanian: (Infosys Technologies Limited)
Peter Walraven: (NEC Philips)
Thierry Cros: (Abylsen)
Jackson Miller: (http://jaxn.org)
Nitesh Agrawal.
Lars Hansen: (NSW Department of Lands) The Agile manifesto reflects why most of us are involved in the software development process.
Petr Gangnus: (http://accelerando.euweb.cz) In a motivated community it could work well. But what if users are not motivated? Are we to use the method anyway? How?
Anthony T Davis: (Noridian Administrative Services)
Claude Aubry: (aubryConseil)
Dinesh Mohata.
Rajiv Sundar: (ETS)
Alex Felipe II.
Mohannad Ismail: I totally support the agile manifesto, and support the simplicity in software development.
Daniel Vasquez Lopez: (Microsoft)
Robert Xeno: (Indicative Data) Sensibility of Agility
Claudio Perrone: (InnerWorkings) How do you create a strong, positive culture within a team/organization? I considered this problem several times throughout my career. In fact, I think about it all the time. At some point in my life, my habitual focus on self-improvement gained a whole new dimension as I realized that I could achieve something really amazing only with the synergistic cooperation of others. As developers, we are used to consider software development in pure technical terms: we focus on various technologies, we master the tools and we improve the processes. While all these elements are very important, there is one fundamental omission; we often forget about the people we work with. No, I'm not referring to the resources we allocate in a project plan; I'm rather thinking about individuals like you and me, with their cultural differences, their talents and the ideas that they bring, the ones with their struggle to keep up with endlessly evolving technologies, but also with their pride for a job well done. I recently had a conversation with a developer who told me that people have to earn his respect and trust. He was pretty surprised to hear that I assume people are totally trustworthy unless proven differently over time. I can understand his point of view. It is the result of a self-preserving mechanism that is unfortunately very common in too many corporate environments; in fact I, for one, have been poisoned by years of the worst corporate (anti) cultures, witnessing people fighting against each other on a daily basis; it’s within enterprises after all that I learned terms such as deception, hidden agenda, blame game, scapegoat, etc. It does not have to be like that, however. It takes incredible courage, passion, openness, integrity, determination, respect. Incidentally, I can also argue that these are the same values at the core of all agile methodologies, with their emphasis on individuals and interactions.
John King: (Event Inventory) I am Scrum Master for a team that supports and enhances multiple eCommerce and eBusiness Web sites.
Christian James: (Noir Consulting)
Dhandapani Natarajan: (eFunds International India Pvt Ltd) We, in eFunds Prepaid Solutions team, extensively follow the scrum methodology to reap the benefits of quicker ROI. Our teams are built on a mix of on-shore and offshore associates but yet we could effectively follow scrum methodology with a small overlapping window for the daily scrum meetings and sprint planning meetings.
Ofer Deshe: (Simbiosi) I totally support the manifesto. This is an efficient an effective way to produce customer centred systems, addressing changing needs and promotes simplicity. And more selfishly it brings back the enjoyment of innovation, responsiveness and productivity when creating interactive systems.
Jeff Cooper.
SALINA BT. MOHD ASI: (Northern University College of Engineering of Malaysia)
Augusto Sansoni: (ASG) I agree with the principles of the Agile Manifesto and I am sure they will pave the path for an increasing business with our customers.
Dylan Hogg: (Fairfax Digital) Just makes sense.
Mark Walker: (General Atomics)

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